#GOKCD
Interscholastic athletics are an important part of the educational culture at Kentucky Country Day School and are considered to be an essential component in the overall development of our students. Development of character, sportsmanship, and a lifelong appreciation for physical activity, teamwork, and interpersonal relationships are the primary goals that drive the athletic program.

The Bearcat athletic program offers 14 sports, over 50 middle and upper school teams, and some of the best athletic facilities in the state. Our program has produced both team and individual state champions, and our teams compete against some of the biggest schools in the region. We’re serious about athletics here at KCD, which is why sports and fitness are part of every school day.

After meeting their athletic requirement, almost 80% of upper school students continue to compete in our athletic program. Our student-athletes are often recognized for achievements in academics and the arts as well as for efforts on the playing field.

We believe that athletics provides a unique opportunity to develop character, sportsmanship, and teamwork. The Bearcats have been presented with the Sportsmanship Recognition Award by the KHSAA a number of times over the last several years.

Upper School Athletics

List of 16 items.

  • Upper School Athletic Philosophy

    KCD offers its upper school students a full range of team and individual-oriented sports. Many of these sports offer varsity and  junior teams and are open to all students as allowed by KHSAA/governing agency rules and guidelines and school requirements and policy.

    KCD will strive to offer the best coaching, facilities, and equipment possible to provide the best overall experience and greatest opportunity for success.

    While winning at all costs is not the focus or philosophy of the athletic program, the driving force in individual and team development will be to produce the greatest opportunity for success.  The KCD Athletic Department encourages student athletes to participate in as many sports as possible.
  • Upper School Athletic Policies and General Information

    During his or her high school career, each KCD student is required to participate in two extracurricular activities. This participation may be at any high school level (freshman, JV, or varsity) and both may be in the same sport. On occasion, substitutions may be made, primarily for medical reasons. All substitutions must be approved in writing by the athletic director and the director of upper school.
  • Insurance

    Each athlete is required to provide proof of insurance for athletic participation. This information is recorded on the school’s physical form. KCD provides catastrophic insurance for all athletes participating in a school-sanctioned program. In addition, the KHSAA provides catastrophic insurance for athletes who play sports sanctioned by the KHSAA.
  • Attendance

    Attendance at athletic practices and games is required for all team members. If an athlete must be excused from practice, he or she should first speak with the team’s coach. To be excused from a practice, a student must be ill, injured, absent from classes, or have an academic conflict. In the event of an injury, the student must be seen by the athletic training staff to receive an excused absence. If a student must miss a game due to a family event, it is best to notify the coach well in advance of the game. In the event that a student will be on a school sponsored trip and not able to play in a game, he or she must notify the coach at the start of the season. Unexcused absences from practices or games can result in game suspensions or dismissal from a team. Missed practices for any reason may impact playing time in contests.

    In order to participate in any extracurricular event, whether it be practice or.a game, students must arrive at school by 10:00 a.m. Any exceptions to this policy must be granted by the division director.
  • Uniform and Equipment Distribution and Collection

    KCD strives to provide high quality equipment and uniforms for its teams. In some cases, athletes are required to purchase equipment or certain uniform components that are personal in nature and are kept by the athlete after the season. When uniforms and equipment are distributed, they become the responsibility of the athlete. Any lost, stolen, or inappropriately damaged uniforms or equipment must be replaced by the student at market cost. At the end of the season, athletes are responsible for returning all equipment and uniforms by the date designated by the coach. All equipment and uniforms must be returned within two weeks of the end of the season. If an athlete quits a team, all equipment and uniforms must be returned immediately. Athletes who do not return or replace equipment distributed by KCD will not be eligible to participate until they are in good standing with the athletic program.
  • Sportsmanship and Conduct

    Kentucky Country Day School athletes should:
    • Be courteous to visiting teams and officials.
    • Respect the integrity and judgment of officials and accept their decisions without question.
    • Respect the facilities of the host school and the trust extended by the host.
    • Play hard and to the limit of their potential and ability.
    • Realize that the true athlete does not give up, nor do they quarrel, cheat, or grandstand.
    • Encourage teammates and fellow athletes.
    • Be modest when successful and be gracious in defeat.
    • Kentucky Country Day School parents and fans should:
    • Realize that they represent the school just as distinctly as the players on a team and therefore have an obligation to encourage through personal example the practice of good sportsmanship by others.
    • Understand that good sportsmanship involves applauding good team play, individual skill, and outstanding examples of sportsmanship and fair play exhibited by either team.
    • Treat visiting teams and officials as our guests.
    • Respect the judgment of officials, realizing that their decisions are based on fast-moving game conditions as they observe them from their vantage point.
    • Be modest when successful and be gracious in defeat.
  • Drug and Alcohol Policy

    As a student-athlete and member of the KCD community, you must recognize that you have a responsibility to conduct yourself in a manner that represents yourself, your family, your team, your school, and your community with dignity. You must further understand that actions that negatively impact yourself, your family, team, school, or community are grounds for disciplinary consequences, up to and including dismissal from the team.

    A student shall not, regardless of the quantity, use, consume, possess, buy, sell, or give away any beverage containing alcohol, any nicotine product (including vapes), marijuana, steroid, or any controlled substance. It is not a violation of this policy for a student to be in possession of a legal drug specifically prescribed for the student’s own use by his or her doctor. Depending on the nature of the incident, its legal disposition, the danger posed to others, and/or the impact on the KCD community, removal of student from any or all extracurricular participation for a significant period or time may occur. This is not intended to render guilt by association, such as cases in which many student-athletes might be present at a party where only a few violated the standard.

    In the case of an infraction involving a possible suspension or expulsion from a team, the student may receive a hearing before the coach, director of athletics, and the division director. The student may need to be accompanied by his or her parents at this hearing.
    The decision to expel or suspend an athlete from a team will be made by the Director of Athletics after consultation with the involved coach and the Head of School. This decision will be made after a hearing with the student, if one is offered.

    In cases not involving suspension or expulsion, the head coach will determine the disciplinary action to be taken. If the athlete feels this action is excessive or overly severe, he or she may request a hearing with the director of athletics. In these cases, the director of athletics makes the final decision.

    The school reserves the right to determine the appropriate sanction in the event that a student violates this policy.

    If a student in violation of this rule is unable to participate in interscholastic sports due to injury, academics, or otherwise, the penalty may not take effect until that student is able to participate again.
  • Hazing

    Abusive or humiliating acts against another are contradictory to the ideals at KCD. Therefore, hazing in any form, either mental or physical, will not be tolerated. No one, freshmen or others, has to “earn his or her way” onto a team by submitting to ridicule from members of the team. It is the duty of each team member to discourage this behavior.
  • Game/Practice Cancellations

    On occasion, practices and games must be cancelled for a variety of reasons. When this occurs, the following steps are taken:
    • Announcements are made in the appropriate grade levels over the school’s PA system.
    • The athletic web page for that sport will reflect cancellations.
    • Coaches are encouraged to notify parents via email.
    • Makeup dates are announced at the earliest possible time.
  • Academic Eligibility Requirement

    All decisions on eligibility will be decided by the Division Director.

    Regular standards of eligibility will also be governed by the rules of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association.
  • Sports Awards

    Varsity Athletic Awards will be given out each season during the team banquet or an upper school athletic awards assembly. The awards will be based on a specified list of criteria for each award. Athletic pins, certificates and “team specific” awards are distributed during team banquets/parties. Players will be given a sport pin if it is the first time they have played for the team. In subsequent years, they will earn a bar for their letter as appropriate. Team captains will receive a star for their letter. Letters are awarded based on requirements established for each individual sport. Varsity Letter Monograms may be purchased individually through the Athletic Department (at a reduced rate as offset by the Athletic Department contribution) or as a part of the purchase of a KCD letter jacket.
  • Athletic Trainer

    KCD currently contracts a part-time certified athletic trainer from the Kentucky Orthopedic Rehab Team (KORT). The training room is equipped to meet the basic sports medicine needs of our student-athletes. The training room is generally open from 3:00 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. on regular school days, and the trainer is available during most home sporting events.
  • Students with Special Medical Needs

    It is the responsibility of student-athletes to inform their coach and the trainer of any special medical needs they have prior to the beginning of practice. These needs will be kept in confidence by the coach. Additionally, any special medications (such as asthma inhalers, diabetic medication, etc.) should be given to the coach and/or trainer to keep for emergency situations. The medication should be clearly labeled with the student’s name, and must be accompanied by appropriate prescription and administration guidance from the student’s health care provider.
  • Additional Forms

    Often, players may be required to complete and submit additional forms in order to participate. These forms may be league-, sport- or team-specific. As with physical forms, no athlete will be allowed to participate without completing all required forms.
  • Supervision of Athletes

    The KCD athletic program is responsible for the supervision of athletes during practice times and games. After practice sessions and games, coaches are required to stay with their players until suitable transportation departs with the players from the school or game site. Parents are expected to be prompt in picking their children up after practices and games. Athletes may be suspended from participation if parents are habitually late picking up their children, causing an undue burden of supervision on the coaching staff. If a practice or game is not immediately after school, parents must provide care for their children during the interim time period. Parents are encouraged to take advantage of the school’s many after-school program options. KCD does not guarantee supervision of its spectators at all events, and parents should be responsible for their children when they are attending but not participating in a KCD athletic event.
  • Parent Expectations

    Parent Rules and Tips to Follow

    Attend as many games as possible. It means a lot to your child to have you in the stands supporting him/her. Time flies by quickly and your children grow up fast. Enjoy the days you can be there, they create lifelong memories.

    Realize that your entrance to the contest is a privilege—not a right to attend. Your ticket is not a pass to verbally abuse officials and coaches. Be positive and support not only your child and his/her team but also both teams. Applaud good performances regardless of the group they represent. Be an exemplary role model and demonstrate good sportsmanship in every possible manner. Be an example for those around you. All signs should be appropriate. Only use cheers that support and uplift the teams involved.

    Let those around you who are negative know they are not appreciated. Stand up for all the spectators, athletes, and officials. Let those who are obnoxious realize it is not okay and you will inform a school official if necessary.

    Respect the calls made by the officials. Remember they are human too. Many sub-varsity level officials are new and still in the learning process. You should never question a judgment call made by an official and certainly don’t make a scene. Let the coach question any call that has to do with rules interpretation. Realize that officials are doing their best to help promote the athlete. Admire their willingness to participate in front of public crowds.

    Learn the rules of the game. You will understand and better appreciate all aspects of the competition.

    Watch the game with team goals in mind. A coach will do what is best for the team. When a group has a losing season many coaches will set team goals as an approach to achieve success. Your child is part of the whole team. Support his/her role in the group no matter how big or small. There is no “I” in Team. 

    Accept the outcome of the game; win with class, lose with dignity. Focus on the effort your child gave during the contest. Support what they did right. Let them know that mistakes are part of the learning process. If they learn from their mistakes they become winners in the end. Grow and move on. Do not get frustrated if your child is not playing well or the team is losing. Losing is part of competition and kids need to learn how to lose. Encourage athletes to keep their perspective of the contest, win or defeat.

    Encourage your child to participate in more than one sport. Children need to be involved in lots of activities including team and individual sports. (The hours between 3-6 pm are critical.) The most important thing is not to push them into something they do not want to do just because you want them to. Respect their individual differences.

    Refrain from using alcohol, tobacco, and drugs. The use of any of these substances on campus before, during, or after a contest is prohibited. Remember these are school-age children, not professional athletes. Tailgating on or near a school site should be nothing more than a barbeque. It is illegal to use controlled substances on school property. Your behavior is altered while you are under the influence. Be a good citizen and role model not only for your children but for others around you.

    Bruce Brown, (2002) also offers the following comments and advice for parents to follow:

    “All adults involved need to do their part and provide the athlete with the help and assistance he/she really needs to perform well. As such, parents need to address the following critical issues:
    1. Ask their child questions about why they play, what their goals and roles are and then accept young athletes’ reasons as their own.
    2. Once parents know their children are safe physically and emotionally they should release them to the experience (the game, the team and the coach).
    3. During the game, parents should model poise and confidence and keep their focus on the team.
    4. After the game, parents should give their children space and time and leave them alone.
    5. Parents should be a confidence builder by maintaining a consistent perspective and not saying or doing anything that will have their children feel like their self-worth is tied to playing time or outcome of a game.

    When parents stop and analyze the athletic experience for their own children, the reasons they want their kids to play sports involve providing an opportunity to develop physically, emotionally and to enjoy. The side benefits of playing sports include giving kids a good opportunity to learn how to work and get along with others, to take good risks in a public arena and survive, to learn to set and achieve goals by developing positive work habits, to learn how to succeed and fail with dignity, and to develop friendships outside the family unit that can last for a life time.”

    As stated earlier student involvement in school sports lasts relatively a short while. The primary focus should be on character development. Closely related to this development is an emphasis on a student’s academic performance. Participation in athletics is a privilege in a kid’s life that hopefully leads them to developing into a well-rounded individual. It is the parent’s responsibility to remind their kids of this. We sometimes get lost in thought that our child is like no other and he/she possesses super human skills and will without a doubt be a professional athlete. The NCAA commercial states, “Most athletes go professional in something other than Sports.”

    Parent-Coach Rapport


    Every parent should make an effort to get to know their child’s coach. Most programs schedule pre-season athlete/coach/parent meetings where introductions, policies, procedures, rules, and expectations are addressed.

    This is the ideal time for parents and coaches to make initial contact. This is the opportunity to address questions that the parent has in regards to the upcoming season. Both the parent and the coach are committed to bring the best out in the student athlete. The most productive environment in which a young person can improve occurs when the parent and the coach establish a mutual understanding of each other’s responsibilities.

    Parents have the right to expect clear expectations from the coaches. Likewise, coaches will better communicate with parents when they are made aware of family concerns and the athlete’s medical issues. Obviously, if parents and coaches work toward these goals the student athlete will benefit the most. 

    Here are some examples of what a parent should expect from a coach:
    - Participation policies and eligibility requirements.
    - School athletic philosophy.
    - Coach’s philosophy.
    - Coaches should define expectations for your son or daughter as well as for all of the members of the team.
    - Coaches should identify skills that are needed to achieve team membership; skills valued to earn playing time.
    - Locations and times of practices, contests and meetings.
    - Coach’s ending a practice on time and parents picking their child up on time respectfully.
    - Team requirements, fees, lettering, special equipment needed, off-season conditioning, appropriate dress, mannerisms, and behavior when traveling.
    - Procedure to follow should an injury occur during participation.
    - Discipline matters that could result in the non-participation from practice or contests or dismissal of your son or daughter from the team.

    As the season gets under way and contests have started, it is important that parents continue their rapport with the coach. Sometimes there are issues or concerns that can and should be discussed. 

    However, there are some issues that should be left to the discretion of the coach.

    Here are a few:
    - Playing time (Playing time is earned, not given on likes or dislikes)
    - Team strategy
    - Play calling
    - Other student participants
    - Confrontational issues

    Some situations may require a conference between the parent and the coach. When the conference is initiated it is important that both parties have a clear understanding of the other’s position.

    The following procedure and protocol should be used to help promote a resolution to the problem:
    - Email the coach to set up an appointment
    - Do not confront a coach during an event, immediately after an event or during practice.
    - If the coach cannot be reached, or does not respond within 48 hours, call the athletic director.

    If the parent-coach meeting does not reach a satisfactory resolution, call to make an appointment with the athletic director and/or principal. At this meeting, the parent, coach, athletic director, and or/principal will discuss the issue and try to reach an understanding.

    Participation in school activities is one of the most accurate predictors of success later in life. Each extracurricular activity is a very important part of a student’s overall education. Students will learn work ethic, teamwork, sportsmanship, interpersonal relationships, responsibility, and persistence. These characteristics and traits help promote a successful life. The coaches and athletic administrators want students to have a very positive experience while participating in athletics in each school district. With parental help and positive support of the staff, the experience can be rewarding for everyone involved.

Middle School Athletics

List of 5 items.

  • Middle School Athletic Philosophy

    1. KCD offers its middle school students a full range of team and individual-oriented sports. These sports are open to all students as allowed by KHSAA/league rules and guidelines. School requirements and policy must also be followed. Most teams are grade-based. In any sport where no middle school team exists, seventh and eighth grade students may be allowed to try out for varsity/junior varsity teams, but team membership and/or playing time are not guaranteed. In addition, KHSAA/governing agency rules and guidelines may affect this policy.
    2. The size of each middle school team will vary from sport to sport. Teams should attempt to play every team member when possible, but playing time is not promised for any team or player. Particular sports may sometimes have limitations in the number of participants. In this situation, the coach and the Director of Athletics may establish an appropriate number allowed on a team. The decision to limit team size will typically be based on factors such as facilities, safety, and league regulations as well as other issues and guidelines. When teams are limited in size, KCD may attempt to accommodate all players by establishing additional teams for the affected sport or providing suggestions for alternative playing or training options. This will not be possible in all situations, however, and KCD is not obligated to provide playing opportunities when it will be too great of a burden on the Athletic Department or school.
    3. KCD will strive to offer the best coaching, facilities, and equipment possible to provide the best overall experience and greatest opportunity for success. 
  • Middle School Athletic Policies

    The primary goal of the middle school athletic program is to give students an opportunity to participate in various sports while developing their skills and to learn the basics of team membership in a positive atmosphere. Winning games and matches is certainly desirable, but at the middle school level our greater emphasis is on the goals mentioned above. If the team member fulfills the requirements of the school and the coach, he or she will participate in an appropriate number of the contests. Issues of safety, practice, attendance, attitude, or academic concern may take precedence over this policy. Additionally, post-season tournaments may be approached differently where formats place greater emphasis on winning.

    Because student athletes are carrying a greater load than many of their peers, certain guidelines have been established to help them stay on top of their studies while participating on an athletic team:
    1. Students who are carrying any Ds or Fs are required to meet with the teacher of that class for extra help at least once per week. If this time is after school, students will need to miss practice.
    2. Students with Ds or Fs will continue to meet with teachers until progress is significant enough to do without weekly meetings. If no progress is being noted after several weeks, the student may be taken off the team in order to devote more energy to the course.
    3. Concerns from teachers over tests, quizzes, homework, behavior or falling grades before course grades reach D or F can result in the same consequences as explained in numbers one and two.
    4. Teachers and coaches will communicate regularly throughout the season in order to ensure that athletics are not hindering students’ academic success.
    5. Disciplinary action resulting in after-school detention will force students to miss practice time. Continued infractions of school rules or a major violation of school rules may result in expulsion from the team.
    6. While players may remain on the team while experiencing some academic or behavioral difficulties, decreased practice time will almost always result in decreased playing time in games. This is a simple consequence of less preparation than that of teammates.
    7. Students must attend the entire school day in order to participate in a game on that day or receive an excused absence from the division director for the portion of that day missed.
  • Insurance

    Each athlete is required to provide proof of insurance for athletic participation. This information is recorded on the school’s physical form. KCD provides catastrophic insurance for all athletes participating in a school-sanctioned program.
  • Good Sportsmanship

    Good sportsmanship is expected of students at all times in Physical Education classes, in after-school athletics, and on the playground. Good sportsmanship means being gracious in both victory and defeat. Good sports support all other participants and include schoolmates of all ability levels. Good sports do not criticize officials, coaches, or opposing team members. Any behavior that does not reflect these expectations will be addressed by team coaches and may result in disciplinary action.
  • Parent Expectations

    Parent Rules and Tips to Follow

    Attend as many games as possible. It means a lot to your child to have you in the stands supporting him/her. Time flies by quickly and your children grow up fast. Enjoy the days you can be there, they create lifelong memories.

    Realize that your entrance to the contest is a privilege—not a right to attend. Your ticket is not a pass to verbally abuse officials and coaches. Be positive and support not only your child and his/her team but also both teams. Applaud good performances regardless of the group they represent. Be an exemplary role model and demonstrate good sportsmanship in every possible manner. Be an example for those around you. All signs should be appropriate. Only use cheers that support and uplift the teams involved.

    Let those around you who are negative know they are not appreciated. Stand up for all the spectators, athletes, and officials. Let those who are obnoxious realize it is not okay and you will inform a school official if necessary.

    Respect the calls made by the officials. Remember they are human too. Many sub-varsity level officials are new and still in the learning process. You should never question a judgment call made by an official and certainly don’t make a scene. Let the coach question any call that has to do with rules interpretation. Realize that officials are doing their best to help promote the athlete. Admire their willingness to participate in front of public crowds.

    Learn the rules of the game. You will understand and better appreciate all aspects of the competition.

    Watch the game with team goals in mind. A coach will do what is best for the team. When a group has a losing season many coaches will set team goals as an approach to achieve success. Your child is part of the whole team. Support his/her role in the group no matter how big or small. There is no “I” in Team. 

    Accept the outcome of the game; win with class, lose with dignity. Focus on the effort your child gave during the contest. Support what they did right. Let them know that mistakes are part of the learning process. If they learn from their mistakes they become winners in the end. Grow and move on. Do not get frustrated if your child is not playing well or the team is losing. Losing is part of competition and kids need to learn how to lose. Encourage athletes to keep their perspective of the contest, win or defeat.

    Encourage your child to participate in more than one sport. Children need to be involved in lots of activities including team and individual sports. (The hours between 3-6 pm are critical.) The most important thing is not to push them into something they do not want to do just because you want them to. Respect their individual differences.

    Refrain from using alcohol, tobacco, and drugs. The use of any of these substances on campus before, during, or after a contest is prohibited. Remember these are school-age children, not professional athletes. Tailgating on or near a school site should be nothing more than a barbeque. It is illegal to use controlled substances on school property. Your behavior is altered while you are under the influence. Be a good citizen and role model not only for your children but for others around you.

    Bruce Brown, (2002) also offers the following comments and advice for parents to follow:

    “All adults involved need to do their part and provide the athlete with the help and assistance he/she really needs to perform well. As such, parents need to address the following critical issues:
    1. Ask their child questions about why they play, what their goals and roles are and then accept young athletes’ reasons as their own.
    2. Once parents know their children are safe physically and emotionally they should release them to the experience (the game, the team and the coach).
    3. During the game, parents should model poise and confidence and keep their focus on the team.
    4. After the game, parents should give their children space and time and leave them alone.
    5. Parents should be a confidence builder by maintaining a consistent perspective and not saying or doing anything that will have their children feel like their self-worth is tied to playing time or outcome of a game.

    When parents stop and analyze the athletic experience for their own children, the reasons they want their kids to play sports involve providing an opportunity to develop physically, emotionally and to enjoy. The side benefits of playing sports include giving kids a good opportunity to learn how to work and get along with others, to take good risks in a public arena and survive, to learn to set and achieve goals by developing positive work habits, to learn how to succeed and fail with dignity, and to develop friendships outside the family unit that can last for a life time.”

    As stated earlier student involvement in school sports lasts relatively a short while. The primary focus should be on character development. Closely related to this development is an emphasis on a student’s academic performance. Participation in athletics is a privilege in a kid’s life that hopefully leads them to developing into a well-rounded individual. It is the parent’s responsibility to remind their kids of this. We sometimes get lost in thought that our child is like no other and he/she possesses super human skills and will without a doubt be a professional athlete. The NCAA commercial states, “Most athletes go professional in something other than Sports.”

    Parent-Coach Rapport


    Every parent should make an effort to get to know their child’s coach. Most programs schedule pre-season athlete/coach/parent meetings where introductions, policies, procedures, rules, and expectations are addressed.

    This is the ideal time for parents and coaches to make initial contact. This is the opportunity to address questions that the parent has in regards to the upcoming season. Both the parent and the coach are committed to bring the best out in the student athlete. The most productive environment in which a young person can improve occurs when the parent and the coach establish a mutual understanding of each other’s responsibilities.

    Parents have the right to expect clear expectations from the coaches. Likewise, coaches will better communicate with parents when they are made aware of family concerns and the athlete’s medical issues. Obviously, if parents and coaches work toward these goals the student athlete will benefit the most. 

    Here are some examples of what a parent should expect from a coach:
    - Participation policies and eligibility requirements.
    - School athletic philosophy.
    - Coach’s philosophy.
    - Coaches should define expectations for your son or daughter as well as for all of the members of the team.
    - Coaches should identify skills that are needed to achieve team membership; skills valued to earn playing time.
    - Locations and times of practices, contests and meetings.
    - Coach’s ending a practice on time and parents picking their child up on time respectfully.
    - Team requirements, fees, lettering, special equipment needed, off-season conditioning, appropriate dress, mannerisms, and behavior when traveling.
    - Procedure to follow should an injury occur during participation.
    - Discipline matters that could result in the non-participation from practice or contests or dismissal of your son or daughter from the team.

    As the season gets under way and contests have started, it is important that parents continue their rapport with the coach. Sometimes there are issues or concerns that can and should be discussed. 

    However, there are some issues that should be left to the discretion of the coach.

    Here are a few:
    - Playing time (Playing time is earned, not given on likes or dislikes)
    - Team strategy
    - Play calling
    - Other student participants
    - Confrontational issues

    Some situations may require a conference between the parent and the coach. When the conference is initiated it is important that both parties have a clear understanding of the other’s position.

    The following procedure and protocol should be used to help promote a resolution to the problem:
    - Email the coach to set up an appointment
    - Do not confront a coach during an event, immediately after an event or during practice.
    - If the coach cannot be reached, or does not respond within 48 hours, call the athletic director.

    If the parent-coach meeting does not reach a satisfactory resolution, call to make an appointment with the athletic director and/or principal. At this meeting, the parent, coach, athletic director, and or/principal will discuss the issue and try to reach an understanding.

    Participation in school activities is one of the most accurate predictors of success later in life. Each extracurricular activity is a very important part of a student’s overall education. Students will learn work ethic, teamwork, sportsmanship, interpersonal relationships, responsibility, and persistence. These characteristics and traits help promote a successful life. The coaches and athletic administrators want students to have a very positive experience while participating in athletics in each school district. With parental help and positive support of the staff, the experience can be rewarding for everyone involved.

Team Pages

Athletics Team

List of 2 members.

  • Photo of Amy Elliott

    Amy Elliott 

    Athletic Director
    502-423-8334
  • Photo of James Booker

    James Booker III 

    Associate Athletic Director, PE Teacher
    502-814-4343
4100 Springdale Road • Louisville, KY 40241 • (502) 423-0440 • Fax (502) 423-0445
Kentucky Country Day School is a private JK–12, coeducational school located on a spacious 80+ acre campus in Louisville, KY. KCD combines a rigorous academic program with a wide variety of athletic and extracurricular programs. Our outstanding faculty creates an intimate learning environment that is both challenging and supportive.